Difference between revisions of "Archive:Bulletin board"

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[http://everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=1540202 Nice articles at Everything2 about "Internet piracy and the working writer"], worth checking out. [[User:MikeCapone|MikeCapone]] 10:59, 2 Jun 2004 (PDT)
 
[http://everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=1540202 Nice articles at Everything2 about "Internet piracy and the working writer"], worth checking out. [[User:MikeCapone|MikeCapone]] 10:59, 2 Jun 2004 (PDT)
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[http://software.newsforge.com/software/04/06/04/142238.shtml?tid=150&tid=82 Nice article on the concept of a "gift economy"]. [[User:MikeCapone|MikeCapone]] 14:27, 5 Jun 2004 (PDT)
  
 
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Revision as of 21:27, 5 June 2004

Some people have been calling for a bulletin board. This is it. Talk amongst yourselves! Learn how to get started on this wiki if you don't already know. Basically, click on "edit this page" in the left-hand menu and add to the discussion. If you don't like the wiki, check out the other ways to contact us.

Hey folks! I'm Nelson Pavlosky from the Swarthmore Coalition for the Digital Commons, one of the founders and sysadmins for FreeCulture.org. Why don't you start off by telling us what you think of the site? -- Nelson 20:13, 11 May 2004 (PDT)


How did you manage to set up such a simple and well-organized site? But, I was just wondering about your position on free culture and peer-to-peer technology. Do people have a right to share information? If there is a limit, where does that limit fall?

I think that "intellectual property" is a necessary evil at best, and a disastrous assault on civil liberties at its worst. This does not mean that I'm necessarily for the abolishment of copyright law or for widespread intentional infringement. I am against using "warez" (proprietary software which is illegally traded online), as it helps keep you addicted to closed, proprietary solutions; I think it is clear that the moral high ground is to use and support copylefted/free software.
As for sharing copyrighted music, it is clear that (in the USA) the Constitution established copyright to encourage creativity and benefit the public in a utilitarian fashion, not to protect some natural right of authors/creators. Keeping this in mind it is clear that if copyright begins to hinder creativity rather than helping it, it needs to be reduced in power and scope. Given that nobody is sure whether filesharing of copyrighted music is helping or hurting the recording industry as a whole (including indie labels, not just the RIAA), I think it is rather hasty and irresponsible to attempt to prohibit the practice. Ultimately, however, I believe it is ideal to participate in a gift economy and only listen to/support/share copylefted music. --Nelson 01:05, 3 Jun 2004 (PDT)
It should be pointed out that not all who label themselves free-culture advocates are in favor of total revocation of copyright and instituting a true gift economy of information. Lawrence Lessig is in support of a shortened copyright length similar to the length of copyright in the 19th or early 20th century (I believe the example he liked was 20 years with 20-year renewal).
And even those who do favor absolute revocation of copyright are fond of quoting Richard Stallman's "free as in free speech, not free beer", and look for means by which content creators can be compensated for their work through distributional or marketing leverage and so on. Abstractart 23:22, 3 Jun 2004 (PDT)

Nice articles at Everything2 about "Internet piracy and the working writer", worth checking out. MikeCapone 10:59, 2 Jun 2004 (PDT)

Nice article on the concept of a "gift economy". MikeCapone 14:27, 5 Jun 2004 (PDT)